European Elections Nancy

Greens likely to win election simulation, survey says

European flag in front of the EP in Strasbourg (photo: European Parliament)
European flag in front of the EP in Strasbourg (Photo: European Parliament)

Publié le by Anna Hundehege (author)

Topic(s): European Elections Nancy

The Greens are heading to obtain the majority of votes in this weeks simulation of the european elections, according to a recent survey. Front Runner Anaïs Andrä would therefore be likely to become the next president of the European Commission. 

However, she depends on the approval of the mainly conservative European Council and of another 17% of the Parliament, which may be a problem, says our european affairs correspondent.

A possible partner might be GUE/NGL who is third with 22% of the votes. However, their priorities seem to be set quite differently as the debate let already suggest.

If the Campus had voted directly after the debate on March, 28th, the Greens would have obtained the majority of votes corresponding 33,3% and 250 seats in Parliament. 

Front Runner Anaïs Andrä would therefore be likely to become the next president of the European Commission provoking the problem, however, that she depends on the approval of the mainly conservative European Council and of another 17% of the Parliament.

"Of course, the public opinion is not fully determined by now, but the advance of 11% that Ms. Andrä has towards Mr. Erkkilä will nevertheless be difficult to make up until May, 25th, a result that reveals the strong concern for environmental issues in the context of global climate change", our European affairs correspondent says.

The new dominating conservative party reaching the second best result after the Greens is ECR.

Established parties, which were expected to hold the majority of seats, achieve a historically bad outcome: The Social and Democrats obtained no more than 9% of the votes (9 seats), the result of 7% for the European People's Party (7 seats) is even worse. 

Analysts say this is party due to a weak campaign, adding that there is certainly a task for Mr. Romeuf et Ms. Geier to search for the reasons of this harsh defeat. 

The liberal parties ALDE (9%) and EFD (2%) also stay largely behind their results of the last European elections.

Among the 51 students who participated in the survey, only 53% attended the first debate between the different European Parties presenting their political program for the coming elections. 

“Wonderful achievement”

"The interest in European political issues does not seem any higher in Nancy than in the rest of Europe", our european affairs correspondent says. "The results show that the majority of those who followed the debate were already more or less well informed about the European parties before, while those who did not know much about them were mainly not present", our correspondent added. 

"The small public during the debate is not due to an over-information about European politics on Campus – but I guess we all know what the “facteur manquant” is", she continues. 

Generally, the debate was received in a very positive way by the spectators of whom 74% claimed that it helped them to know the parties even better. 

46% of those who did not attend the debate declared the same, which may be some statistical inconsistency.

Not surprising at all was the large majority of 80% believing that the European integration is a “wonderful achievement”. The attitude towards the Euro as common currency, on the contrary, is rather unexpected considering that it is generally regarded as symbol of the financial crisis among the European population: While no single person thinks of it as “just terrible”, 76% look absolutely favorably upon it.

The way the European Union is governed is neither “horrible”, nor “perfect”, but definitely needs to be improved. How this shall be done stays unanswered, but this might be a question for the parties to integrate in their political program as the voters see a real problem to solve there. 

Maybe this could become a decisive question for the elections opening the general debate about future perspectives of the European Union.

Generally, there is a clear preference for left wing on Campus Greens, G/NU/NGL and S&D obtaining a large majority of 60%. This might be an indicator for a discontentment with the current economic policy in the European Union and the way in which is dealt with the financial crisis.

Especially, the Liberal Parties and EPP will need to face their remarkably low scores and think about possible political implications in order to avoid failure.

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